Food Choices to Fill Nutrient Shortfalls

Feb 09, 2022

Food Choices to Fill Nutrient Shortfalls

FOOD SOURCES OF IMPORTANT SHORTFALL NUTRIENTS3

NUTRIENT

FOOD

NUTRIENT CONTENT

% RDA

Vitamin A

Beef liver, 3 oz

7,700 ug

856%

 

Pumpkin, 1 cup canned

1,906 ug

212%

 

Sweet potato, 1 medium

1,906 ug

122%

 

Spinach, 1 cup cooked

943 ug

105%

 

Carrot, 1 whole fresh

509 ug

57%

 

Cantaloupe, ½ whole

466 ug

52%

 

Mango, 1 whole fresh

181 ug

20%

Vitamin C

Orange juice, 1 cup fresh

124 mg

138%

 

Broccoli, 1 cup cooked

101 mg

112%

 

Green pepper, 1 whole

96 mg

107%

 

Strawberries, 1 cup fresh

85 mg

94%

 

Cauliflower, 1 cup cooked

55 mg

61%

 

Watermelon, 1 slice

23 mg

26%

 

Baked potato, 1 whole

20 mg

22%

Vitamin D

Salmon, sockeye, 3 oz.

375 IU

63%

 

Fortified milk, 1 cup

120 IU

20%

 

Beef liver, 3 oz.

49 IU

8%

 

Egg yolk, 1 large

37 IU

6%

 

Butter, 1 Tbsp.

9 IU

2%

Vitamin E

Almonds, 1 oz.

7.4 mg

49%

 

Safflower oil, 1 Tbsp.

4.6 mg

31%

 

Sunflower seeds, 2 Tbsp.

4.2 mg

30%

 

Shrimp, boiled, 3 oz.

1.9 mg

13%

 

Sweet potato, 1 medium

0.81 mg

5%

Calcium

Yogurt, 1 cup

372 mg

37%

 

Tofu, ½ cup

253 mg

25%

 

Cheddar cheese, 1 oz.

204 mg

20%

 

Milk, 1 cup

129 mg

13%

 

Kale, 1 cup cooked

94 mg

9%

 

Kidney beans, 1 cup canned

92 mg

9%

 

Broccoli, 1 cup cooked

62 mg

6%

Magnesium

Spinach, 1 cup cooked

157 mg

51%

 

Navy beans, 1 cup cooked

96 mg

31%

 

Garbonzo beans, 1 cup cooked

79 mg

25%

 

Wheat germ, ¼ cup raw

69 mg

22%

 

Figs, 5 dried

29 mg

9%

 

Whole-wheat bread, 1 slice

23 mg

7%

 

Sirloin steak, 3 oz.

21 mg

7%

 

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). NHANES is designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The survey is unique in that it combines interviews and physical examinations. The statistics reported in this fact sheet are based on the RDA, which is helpful for assessing individual nutrient needs.

America is in the midst of a nutrition crisis that has yet to be fully addressed.

  • Data from the government’s National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) shows that most people have problems meeting recommended nutrient intake for the following nutrients: vitamins A, C, D, and E, calcium and magnesium.1

Current dietary and lifestyle choices have led to a growing gap between the amount of nutrients people should consume and the actual nutrients they are consuming.

  • The Healthy Eating Index (HEI) is a measure of diet quality based on how many servings of food from various food groups are eaten. Regardless of weight status, American adults score about 50 out of a possible 100 points.1
  • The HEI score shows that most people need to make significant changes in how they eat to meet nutrient goals.

Nutrient shortfalls left unaddressed have the potential to lead to chronic diseases such as osteoporosis2, which will increase healthcare costs.

  • In addition to making more nutrient-rich food choices, nutrient shortfalls may also be addressed by including dietary supplements, which provide important nutrients without added calories.
  • A healthy diet, physical activity and dietary supplements together can encourage a healthy lifestyle that meets nutrient needs.

For more information visit:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans | www.dietaryguidelines.gov

Nutrition.gov | www.nutrition.gov

National Institutes of Health MedlinePlus | www.nlm.nih.gov/ medlineplus/nutrition.html

National Osteoporosis Foundation | www.nof.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention | www.cdc.gov

1 Fulgoni V. NHANES 2001-2008 analysis. 2011 unpublished.

2 Warensjo E, Byberg L, Melhus H, et al. Dietary calcium intake and risk of fracture and osteoporosis: prospective longitudinal cohort study. BMJ 2011;342:d1473.

3 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2012. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 25. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/ndl